Tag Archives: AOL Music

RIP AOL Music

aolmusicAOL Music announced, or at least its laid off employees announced on friday afternoon that it will shut down. Shortly after that, AOL Radio’s twitter account explained that the streaming service operated by Slacker would not be shutting down. The shut down encompasses the main site that offers free music videos, song lyrics,  downloads, and music news and includes sites Noisecreep (hard rock and heavy metal); The Boot (country); The Boombox (hip hop/R&B); as well as Spinner and AOL Music.

AOL Radio and reportedly Shoutcast will survive the cuts. In June of 2011 AOL Radio paired up with Slacker in a deal that moved their channels into Slacker’s portal of offerings. Slacker picked up the traffic and also the costs of streaming those channels.

Shoutcast, which AOL acquired back in the late 90s, is another story entirely. That portal gives bandwidth to more than 50,000 global stations. They have a very large audience and are quite possibly the biggest streaming portal online. (It’s never been clear to me what the business model is for Shoutcast, but that’s another story.)

AOL has certainly been through changes, struggling to retain or regain brand prominence in recent years. In 2011 they bought Huffington Post and have placed more emphasis on becoming a top notch news portal. AOL Music is likely a victim of that transition.

RAIN Summit Europe is Thursday May 23 in Brussels. Register here!

How The Big Music Sites Stack Up

Music consumption is increasing, and this heat map clearly shows where and who has the traffic. In case you thought Pandora was the big boy, let the visual speak for itself – the real elephant in the room is YouTube. 31% of all videos on that site are music now, and it’s the number one music consumption destination on the web – at least according to this info based on data from Compete.

ITunes is not web based and therefore does not qualify for this comparison. Grooveshark, which has been growing audience faster than its been obtaining licenses from big labels, grew traffic 236% in 2010. By comparison, Pandora grew only 116%. Shoutcast grew 180%. AOL Music, Last.fm, Slacker and MOG all grew, as did rdio – by a whopping 3680%. But given that rdio just launched last year, that growth was from nothing to tiny, as the heat map reveals.

Napster lost audience, but more surprising, so did Spotify. We7, the British startup with Peter Gabriel as one of its founding investors, is growing.

There are a lot of other sites on the map that aren’t so much streaming music platforms as they are music download sites, or artist communities, or other types of music platforms. It’s the best snapshot I’ve seen so far of the way that streaming music platforms stack up globally. You can get a better picture, along with mouse over data on each site, and a growth chart, here.

%d bloggers like this: