Tag Archives: Mobile device

Here’s How Apple Can Make Money For Advertisers

In North America, mobile advertising revenues grew 111% from 2011 to 2012, while at the same time netting 83% growth globally. Growth in Asia just slightly outpaced North America during the same period. Contributing factors to the growth are easy to identify – widespread smartphone adoption and more time spent on mobile devices, along with increasingly better monetization of mobile ad services.

Mobile ad services are figuring out better ways to optimize the advertising experience for advertisers. This is obviously the key to growing revenue. Something that Apple understands, as they are about to launch iTunes Radio as an ad supported platform. So here’s what I would do if I were in charge of monetizing that platform.

  • iTunes has 500 million users across the globe. Those users are mobitunes radio 3ile, and they like to consume content, mostly music. But over the past few years they have decided that they don’t have to own that music, they’re happy to stream it instead.
  • iTunes also has lots of information on those users – who they are, where they live, what devices they use, how old they are, and what they like to watch and listen to. That’s the stuff that advertisers really want. But that’s not the holy grail.
  • iTunes has a credit card on file for all those users. Because they buy songs, video and apps from the ITunes store already. So if you are an advertiser, and you are selling something online, how would you like to sell it in Apple’s store, where users can purchase it with just one click? Sure, you’ll pay them something for that, but it’ll be worth it because it makes it so easy for the customer.

That’s how I think Apple could revolutionize mobile ad monetization…

Advertisements

Mobile Listening Grows Again

More than a quarter of mobile subscribers listened to music on their phones in April, according to new data from comScore. 25.8% of US mobile subscribers used their mobile device to listen to music, a number that is up 1.3% from the first quarter stat. Texting is the most popular activity at 74.1%, with app use, browser use, social interactions and gaming being the other popular activities. 

The increasing popularity of mobile music listening is having an impact that is interesting to observe. Last week I wrote about Samsung as the latest mobile phone manufacturer to purchase a streaming service, recognizing the opportunity that lies in providing music content. SiriusXM recently announced a major upgrade to its mobile streaming offering – in the future, hanging on to their subscribers will likely require more and more competition with streaming services that are mobile-ready.

Meanwhile broadcasters are pressing for FM chips in phones to be mandated by congress, despite resistance by phone manufacturers. This could be a critical piece of broadcast radio’s future survival as mobile listening continues to grow. But the question remains, will listeners choose to listen to fm services when streaming services are available? Given the higher degree of interactivity offered by most streaming options, this is a big question.

 

Consumers That Stream Also Listen To FM In Cars

Nearly 40% of smartphone owners have used their device to listen to a streaming music service while in their car, according to new research by NPD Group on automotive connectivity. Devices and ways to connect them have become a serious focus for the auto industry. 79% of car owners are using a digital device in their cars.

It appears at this point that streaming in the car is used to supplement listening to traditional radio – according to NPD’s Ben Arnold, seventy three percent of drivers report still using their FM radio “always” or “most of the time” during car trips while more than half (57 percent) of vehicle owners say a CD player is vital in their decision to buy a car stereo or entertainment system.

The desire to consume connected content is a challenge for the auto industry as well – as they focus on best ways to integrate mobile connectivity into the car with minimal driver distraction. Apple’s voice controlled Siri  and Microsoft’s motion controlled product found in Kinect are technologies that automakers are looking to integrate into the equation.

Meanwhile, in place of smooth integration, consumers are finding ways to connect their mobile devices using auxillary inputs (18%), USB ports (11%), and Bluetooth technology (56%). This fact – that consumers are so interested in developing workaround ways to use their connected devices in their cars, is a huge indicator of the desirability for a more connected dashboard.

“The key is for auto makers and traditional audio manufacturers to facilitate consumer use of connected devices in the vehicle, allowing content from the smartphone, tablet, or digital media player to easily stream or be controlled through the deck mounted in the dashboard,” Arnold said.  “We’re only going to see greater consumer attachment to social media, streaming audio and video, and other services as content options grow.”

New Data Shows Rapid Growth of Mobile Streaming

A study of global mobile device behavior shows rapid growth in the use of those devices to stream audio and video. Mobile Life is an annual study from TNS of global device consumer behavior.

The study is huge – 34,000 interviews with mobile users in 43 countries. But this chart, which shows the activity level of various services on mobile devices from 2010 to 2011 shows streaming music and video as rising from 0 to significant in a very short period of time.

Pandora, the most listened to Internet radio platform in the US, sees at least 50 percent of listening occurring on mobile devices. Dashboard devices that enhance ease of listening in cars will likely accelerate growth.

The ubiquity of mobile streaming, combined with the allure of the devices themselves, are a huge threat to broadcast listening, and it is a small wonder that broadcast advocates want to see FM chips built in and promoted. It’s also possible that expensive data plans that make it difficult to stream could drive some mobile FM listening on those devices. While I’m skeptical of the uptake that listening to FM on a smartphone will see from consumers, I get why NAB and individuals like Jeff Smulyan of Emmis Broadcasting are pushing it. As mobile usage continues to soar, being part of the mobile content package could be a critical piece of broadcasting’s survival.

%d bloggers like this: